Goodbye Bristol-Myers Squibb

Thanks for the memories BMS…

Pinnacle Trip to Mexico with Bristol-Myers Squibb – 2005

Last week represented the end of an era for me.  I said goodbye to the company and job that I have had for the majority of my adult life.  I started working for Bristol-Myers Squibb in the summer of 2002.  Les and I were married in June of that summer and moved to Orlando, Florida so that he could begin his residency training.  We packed up our belongings in a U-Haul and made the long drive to Florida, moving into our first apartment together.  I started working as a sales rep in the Cardiovascular/Metabolic sales division of BMS on July 1st, 2002.  I came to pharmaceutical sales after spending my first two years out of college in another sales job.  I knew that I was getting into an innovative and exciting industry and profession, and I felt lucky to land this job at a relatively young age.

After only two years, I was promoted to a specialty position in the Neuroscience division, representing a great product that was making a big impact on the mental health community.  I was a Psychology major at the University of Virginia and was very familiar with the consequences of mental illness, through my academic studies and through personal experiences (loved ones, whom shall remain nameless).   The Neuroscience division felt like home.  I was a Neuroscience representative in Orlando for two years, and was lucky enough to transition to the Virginia Beach BMS Neuroscience team when we moved back here in 2006.

Although I don’t like that my job is coming to an end and that Bristol-Myers is essentially getting out of Neuroscience for the time being, I understand that they have business reasons that led them to this decision.  Bristol-Myers Squibb and Otsuka have worked together to launch and promote Abilify and that partnership is drawing to a close.  The timing was right for Otsuka, the company that discovered Abilify, to take over the sales and marketing of the product from BMS.  Otsuka remains committed to Neuroscience and Abilify, and luckily they have decided to expand their sales force to compensate for the loss of the entire BMS sales team.  As a matter of fact, I recently accepted a position to go over to Otsuka and continue promoting Abilify.  Basically I am going to continue doing my exact same job, only for a different employer (more on the how and the why behind this decision in future posts).  As my time with Bristol-Myers draws to a close, I need to say thanks for a wonderful 10+ years.  BMS has been good to me, and I am truly appreciative for all they ways they have helped me.

Thank you for the opportunity to work with so many wonderful, talented people (cliché, but true).  I have been fortunate to have some really great managers during my time at BMS.  I continue to view three of my last four managers as friends, coaches, and mentors.  I have always worked with terrific partners that I have learned so much from, not only about the industry and the business, but about myself as a teammate and professional.  I count many of my current and previous partners and colleagues as personal friends.  Their friendship and support has helped me during the good times and the bad.

Thank you Bristol-Myers for helping to bring to market a truly revolutionary product like Abilify.  It has been an honor and a privilege to promote such a remarkable product for the past eight years.  I am passionate about mental healthcare – the amazing physicians, NP’s, PA’s, Social Workers, Nurses, and Psychologists – and the resilient patients that too often suffer silently among us.  I don’t think I would have stayed in the pharmaceutical industry as long as I have if it weren’t for the opportunity to sell such a great product.  I sold other good products for diabetes, high blood pressure, and antibiotics, but none of those products had the tremendous impact on individuals and families like I have seen Abilify have.  Mental illness can devastate a person’s life – I have seen this too many times.  Seeing a medicine like Abilify help a person return to functioning and get back to being a mom, sister, Uncle, husband, or child is a beautiful thing.  If I have been able to play even the tiniest role in making that happen, I feel good about my work.  Thank you for the research, marketing, and vision that went into the development and promotion of this drug for the last 10 years.

Thank you Bristol-Myers for making medicines that really do extend and enhance human life – a corporate mission that I got to live through my work, but more importantly through my personal experience.  My husband’s life was literally saved by the miracle of medicine – an amazing doctor, a clinical trial at Sloan-Kettering, and four Bristol-Myers Squibb cancer drugs.  When the standard treatments for Hodgkin’s lymphoma did not work for Les, we ended up at Sloan-Kettering in New York City hoping and praying for a cure – something that would make the cancer disappear and stay away forever (God willing).  I will never forget sitting down with the best Oncologist in the world (yep, anyone that cures my husband of cancer gets that title – and he really might be the best in the world) as he described the clinical trial protocol that Les would be undergoing.  I felt tremendous pride and hope seeing the name of the company I worked for next to the names of the drugs that would soon be used to try to kill the cancer cells that had rocked our world.  It felt like we were meant to be at Sloan-Kettering, with this doctor that developed the treatment protocol with these drugs that my company made.  It had to work and thankfully it did.  I will be forever grateful to our incredible doctor, nurses, and to Bristol-Myers Squibb for giving my husband his life and his health back.  That is truly living the mission.

Thank you Bristol-Myers Squibb for your generous benefits.  As I described in my previous post, I have worked in some hard jobs for not very much money in the past.  I know how frustrating it can be to work in a physically and/or mentally demanding job and still not be able to pay the bills.  It sucks.  One of the reasons I got into sales, and have stayed in for as long as I have, is that I feel like I am compensated fairly and the benefits are good.  Many times, when sales are good and the job seems easy and fun, I honestly can’t believe that they pay me to do it.  I think back on  some of my work days in high school and college where I would work on my feet all day at a hotel front desk job and do an overnight waitressing job at a truck stop for only slightly more than minimum wage.  THAT was hard work.  This job has been challenging (in a good way), enjoyable, interesting, and rewarding with decent pay AND benefits.  I am beyond grateful and blessed, and I have not taken my job for granted.  I know that I had a good thing going.

One of the things I have been most thankful for is amazing health insurance.  If you have ever had a serious medical problem, you know that health insurance can be the biggest blessing (if it is good insurance) or your life can be ruined if you are uninsured or under insured.  We had great health insurance that paid for the majority of Les’ cancer treatments and know the importance of being adequately insured.  Now that Les has a pre-existing condition, we also know how expensive it can be to get a good, affordable health insurance plan as an individual (if you don’t work for a big company).  Hopefully the Affordable Care Act will help other people in America get good coverage at affordable prices, but we may be years away from the realization of this goal.  One of the reasons I have continued to work, even after the births of our three kids, is for great medical insurance.  In fact, our kids might not even be here if it were not for the incredible health insurance that I had access to through Bristol-Myers Squibb.

As a result of the cancer treatments that saved Les’ life, we were unable to get pregnant on our own.  We knew that this would probably happen and made preparations before he underwent treatment to make sure we could have children one day, with the help of IVF.  Infertility and our journey to become parents will likely be the subject of another post one day, but let’s just say that it was not an easy road to parenthood.  Infertility treatments, especially IVF, are very expensive.  I don’t know if we could have handled the financial and emotional stress of three rounds of IVF (to get two of our children) without the very comprehensive medical insurance provided by BMS.  All of the shots, drugs, ultrasounds, lab work, office visits, and procedures would have been that much more difficult if  I was constantly worried about paying the total cost for each item.  Most companies do not include infertility coverage in medical benefits, so I know just how fortunate I was that this was covered.  This is yet another reason why I continued to work after having children.  I have to thank a really gifted infertility doctor and Bristol-Myers Squibb for helping to give me two of life’s greatest miracles – Isabella and Jacob.

Last, but not least, I have to thank Bristol-Myers Squibb for giving me the opportunity to job share and work part-time for the past three years.  There are very few pharmaceutical companies that offer this benefit anymore and too few working moms that get to take advantage of any kind of flexible work arrangement when they have babies at home.  After Jacob was born, I was not sure if I could handle going back full-time.  I wanted to continue working, for all of the reasons above and so many more, but I did not think I could be away from my two very young children five days a week.  My supportive boss offered me a chance to apply to job share and work only three days a week (with a partner working the other two days of the week).  I jumped at the opportunity.  The job share position had its share of challenges, but I would not have traded it for anything.  I did not know when I started job sharing that I would have a third baby (no IVF – a surprise miracle), and it made coming back to work after Noah was born a no-brainer.  I was able to be home more days than I was at work when the boys were babies.  I was able to be there when Jacob needed me the most, as we figured out how to help him with all of his delays.  I would have loved to work part-time forever, or at least one more year until Noah was three, but I knew that it would probably not be a permanent thing.  It was almost too good to be true.  I am thankful I was able to job share as long as I did.  I thank Bristol-Myers Squibb for giving me that extra time with my kids, to really be able to have some work-life balance when it was needed most.

I say goodbye to Bristol-Myers and welcome the next chapter of my professional career.  Thank you for a great 10 years!  I can only hope that the next 10 or 20 years can be as fun and rewarding as my time with BMS.  Bristol-Myers is not perfect, but in my experience they lived their mission with patients, customers, and employees.  I hope my next experience with Otsuka will be as positive as my experience with Bristol-Myers Squibb.  Best of luck to you BMS and all my colleagues that remain!

Lessons from an adenoidectomy

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Jacob playing before surgery

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These instructions failed to mention that my child would still be miserable after a week.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It has been a week since Jacob underwent surgery to remove his adenoids – an Adenoidectomy.  I still don’t really understand exactly what adenoids are, where they are, and precisely how/why they are removed, so I will refer you to google or wikipedia if you would like more information.  I do know that at least four different medical professionals that have cared for Jacob over the past three years have told us that we should do this surgery and that removing his adenoids could help his breathing, sleeping (at least having more restful, restorative sleep), and even improve his speech.  Everyone we talked to, and everything I read on the internet, made this surgery seem like a fairly minor ordeal, with the inherent risks of anesthesia and an invasive procedure.

The surgery was originally scheduled in August, right after our trip to Philly for the Livestrong Challenge.  Sometime at the end of that trip, and especially on our first day home, Jacob started limping.  He also had a cold – runny nose, sneezing, coughing, and one low-grade fever.  I was paranoid about putting Jacob through surgery when he was not well.  As I have said before, Jacob is my child who has endured the most  in his young life.  Between the reflux, the stomach troubles, hypotonia, physical and social delays, food allergies, and his ongoing speech delays – nothing has seemed easy or typical with Jacob.  I am usually not a big worrier, but I just had a bad feeling about him undergoing a somewhat elective surgery while he was sick and mysteriously limping.  Jacob’s cold improved before the scheduled surgery, but the mysterious limp continued.  I did what all of us crazy moms do when we are worried – I looked on the internet for answers.  Yes, I may be married to a doctor, but doctors don’t know all the answers and Les was working the night that I was desperately searching for answers on the internet.  The internet as medical resource is a tricky thing.  My research told me that he could have a fairly benign condition called toxic synovitis or he could have something frightening like septic arthritis or leukemia.  Of course, I started obsessing about the worst possible cause of his limp and begged the pediatrician to do a CBC to rule out leukemia.  The pediatrician, and Les, agreed that he probably had toxic synovitis, but thankfully everyone also wanted to do the CBC, an x-ray, and a hip ultrasound just to be safe.  To our relief, all the tests came back normal and I guess we’ll just attribute the mysterious week-long limp to toxic synovitis.

Once Jacob was finally healthy and ready for surgery, I actually was not that worried.  As I said, most people we talked to and everything I had read made the surgery and the recovery seem very straightforward.  The patient instructions even told us that he could eat whatever he wanted and resume his normal activities, as soon as a wanted after surgery.  The surgery was on a Thursday, and I figured he would maybe miss a day of school and be back to himself by Monday at the latest.  The doctor was wonderful and the facility – CHKD Princess Anne – was top notch.  Jacob did pretty well during the surgery and immediately after.  He was tired and fairly clingy that first night and next day.  It was a struggle to get him to drink anything, and he had no interest in eating.  He had a fever over the next 48 hours and was pretty wiped out.  We have been giving him Tylenol or Motrin (usually not recommended after surgery, but ok by our doctor) every 8 hours or so every day for the past week.  Without the medicine he is pretty unhappy and runs a low grade fever.  He is finally drinking more, but is still not really eating much.

It is so hard to truly know if and where a toddler is in pain because he can’t quite verbalize what is bothering him.  It has been exactly one week since the surgery, and Jacob is not as well as I thought he would be by now.  He missed the entire week of school.  I tried to send him on Wednesday, but the nurse called after 2 hours and said he was pretty miserable and should come home.  We have a follow-up appointment tomorrow, so we will find out if all of this is within the realm of normal.  I suspect that it is, but I just wish my sweet little boy would hurry up and get better.  I just hope that this surgery leaves Jacob better than he was before and that we will feel like it was worth it.  I just want Jacob to be the best that he can be.  I just want Jacob to be healthy and happy.  Oh yeah, I would also like his breath to stop smelling so horrific.  Bad breath is a common side effect of this surgery and it should improve after 1-2 weeks, but this is some really stinky stuff.

In hindsight, I probably should not have expected an easy recovery.  I am glad I was not overly worried and stressed about the surgery, but I also could have prepared myself a little better for the possibility of a slower, longer recovery.  After all, everything up to this point with Jacob has been on a longer, slower timeline.  Nothing has been easy for him, so I am not sure why I expected that this would be.  I would just like to see Jacob’s recovery start picking up the pace a bit.  Once he starts sleeping better and eating and drinking more, his demeanor and mood should improve.  Once all of this gets going, I’ll finally feel like we are on the road to a real recovery.

This post may make you itch

 I am suffering from PTSD.  We are finally done with the four letter word parents dread – LICE.  There, I have admitted this simple, yet ugly reality that we were facing almost two weeks ago.  I know – Yuck!  I was almost too disgusted and embarrassed to write about it, but there really is nothing to be embarrassed about.  Head lice can strike anyone, regardless of how “clean” you are, regardless of socioeconomic status, and no matter how careful you are to avoid getting lice.  We suffered through lice several times as kids.  When one of us would get lice, the rest of us would get it.  My mom would line us up for the hours long process of shampoo and combing out the hair.  Unbeknownst to me, she was also suffering through the endless laundry and bagging up stuff as well, usually on her own while my dad was away at sea.  I had also watched my sister-in-law, a working single mom of three beautiful girls with long flowing hair, go through the awful lice drill.  My sister-in-law is one of the cleanest, most protective, and vigilant moms I know and seeing her girls get it really showed me that anyone can become a victim of these nasty little bugs.  When she was going through the first, or even the second bout of head lice, I remember thinking that she was overreacting or going to extremes to get rid of it.  As with many things you think or say before kids – I get it now.  She knew exactly what she was doing and had every right in the world to be upset and a little traumatized, in addition to being extremely cautious to make certain that they never have to deal with lice again.

We had just returned from a wonderful vacation in the Outer Banks complete with great friends, lots of cute kids (9 kids under the age of 7), an abundance of beach and pool time, terrific food and drinks, and plenty of relaxation and fun.  When we finally arrived home from our trip and put the boys to bed, I was tired and felt like I needed a good shower.  As I combed my hair before the shower, I saw it – a tiny, disgusting, live white bug on the teeth of my comb.  The panic set in and I began to furiously comb my hair searching for others.  I found three little suckers in all, but it was more than enough to make me itch from head to toe and imagine nothing but hundreds of these gross things crawling all over my head.  I interrupted story time with Les and Isabella to inspect her head, thinking that she must have it too.  I did not find anything on her head that night so I let her go to sleep.  Les was clean too.  It appeared that I was the only one with a bug problem, for now.

The next six hours involved an expensive trip to Walgreens for lice killing supplies, lots of laundry and bagging of anything that could not be laundered, cleaning. vacuuming, and hair washing and combing for me.  Les was going back to work at 6:00 AM the next day so he was somewhat limited in his ability to help.  I called my mom and asked her to come over the next day.  She thoroughly inspected my head and found no more live bugs.  I treated my head a second time and let her comb through my hair.  We decided to check Isabella’s head again and lo and behold, we found several eggs and a few live bugs.  We spent all of the boys nap time shampooing and combing out her hair – trying to remain calm and not totally freak out (which is what we were really doing).  I had completed 5 loads of laundry (on hot cycle that takes 1.5 hours and hot dryer setting) and had another 8 loads on deck.  I sprayed and cleaned furniture, carpets, and cars.  I stripped everyone’s beds and bagged up all pillows and stuffed animals.  My mom was a lifesaver that day in helping me go through hair, clean, and most importantly trying to help me not lose my mind.

I was close to losing it.  You become paranoid about getting all the eggs out and making sure that they are all dead.  I followed my sister-in-law’s advice and treated Isabella and myself with something every day for a week.  The harsh chemical shampoos are too strong to use daily, but I tried tea tree oil, LiceMD (non-pesticide shampoo), Cetaphil, and olive oil.  We used over-the-counter pesticide shampoo and one of the very expensive new prescription shampoos.  Even though we did not find anything on the boys, we treated them with Cetaphil and with LiceMD for a few days in a row.  Jacob, my hyper-sensitive kid, is now probably forever afraid of combs and won’t let me near him for even the nightly brushing after bath.  I slept apart from Les for the past week to make sure that he did not get anything.  I have never done so much laundry in my life – every day washing all clothes, towels, and sheets. We had no pillows on the couch, no stuffed toys, no Barbies or American Girl dolls.  I threw out all brushes, combs, and probably $100 worth of bows, headbands, and hair ties for Isabella and myself.  That hurt.  I could have probably bagged them up for a few weeks or washed what I could, but I was taking no chances.

I think we are finally through the worst of it.  I am sleeping in the same bed as my husband again.  We now only have to do laundry every few days, the typical amount for a family of 5.  We aren’t boiling the brushes and combs for now.  We will begin taking stuff out of bags soon and again have pillows, stuffed animals, and Barbies to play with.  The PTSD may linger for a little while.  We are still not doing story time in the kid’s beds with them, doing it on the floor instead.  We still put Isabella’s hair in two braids for camp and on weekends.  We continue to look through everyone’s hair at the end of the day during bath or shower time.  Right now, I am debating on whether to Let Isabella go on the camp field trip to a bounce house on Friday.  One of the kids in the neighborhood thinks they got lice from the bounce house last year, and that is stuck in my head, feeding the paranoia and fear about going through this again.  I hate to make her miss her first field trip, but I just don’t think I can handle that right now.  I might just have to take her somewhere better, maybe Busch Gardens or Water Country instead to make up for not being able to go on the field trip.

I know I’ll have to get over this and eventually return to normalcy.  I mean, I was a pretty careful mom because of my history with lice as a kid and my sister-in-law’s experience.  I never let Isabella share brushes, hair things, crowns, hats, or anything.  She knew these rules from a very young age and even independently told a little friend at a dress-up birthday party that she could not put anything on her head that was not hers.  What a good, responsible kid.  It doesn’t matter though.  I still don’t know how Isabella and I got lice.  No one else staying in the beach house, 16 other people, had any lice or even any sign of eggs.  The only thing we did that was different is that Isabella and I went to a movie theater the day before we left the Outer Banks.  It is completely possible that someone who sat in those movie theater seats before us, even days before us, had lice and an egg or a bug transferred from the seat to my head and then to Isabella’s as we snuggled.  I know that movie theaters were one of the popular ways that bedbugs spread throughout major cities and maybe lice can be the same way.  Who knows?  We will never know, and that is part of what can drive you insane with lice.  Unfortunately, I don’t think this will be the last time we have to confront this dreaded pest.  The kids will go to school with other kids, sleepovers and birthday parties will happen, a bounce house or gym will happen again (maybe just not this Friday), and we will go to a movie theater again.  We might just have to bring a towel to put on the seat at the movie theater, and I’ll know to have plenty of wine on hand to get me through if there is a next time.

What is at risk with the Supreme Court’s healthcare ruling today?

I continue to be surprised and disappointed by the lack of knowledge about the Affordable Care Act and lack of support by the general public.  Polling shows that President Obama’s healthcare reform remains unpopular, despite pretty broad public support for the individual items contained in the Affordable Care Act, with the exception of the individual mandate.  You see, when you ask people if kids should be allowed to stay on their parent’s insurance until 26, or if people with pre-existing conditions should be able to get insurance coverage, or if there should be no lifetime dollar caps on what your insurance will pay for your care – most people are all in favor of these things.  What most people fail to understand is that you can’t have all those things without the individual mandate.  Those go hand in hand, at least if we want to have a free-market healthcare system.

I understand how people who have never been really sick, or never had a close family member with a major medical problem, might wonder how the Affordable Care Act helps them and therefore be against it.  I think that is a short-sighted view since almost everyone will get sick at some point, but I can sort of see where they could be coming from.  Almost everyone else who is against the Affordable Care Act falls into one of two camps:  1)  They are misinformed about what the reform does and/or does not do.  There are a lot of lies and misrepresentations about this issue out there.  If you are against the Affordable Care Act because you don’t know much about it or because you only watch Fox News or listen to Rush Limbaugh, please do me a favor and take 5 minutes to learn the facts (links to a few good sources below).   2)  They are against it because it came from the democrats and/or Barack Obama. I hope that this does not represent too many people, but I do believe some people are against it based purely on ideology – kind of ironic considering that the individual mandate idea originally came from a conservative think tank and was a central part of a Republican plan presented against the Clinton healthcare plan.

Today we will find out if the Supreme Court upholds all or part of the Affordable Care Act.  There is plenty of speculation about which way it will go – will they strike down or uphold all or part of it?  What will the ruling mean for healthcare reform and for the presidential election in the fall?  I will leave that talk to the journalists and political pundits.  I am interested in what this ruling will mean for me, for my children, for my family members.  I have a personal stake in this decision and so does every single one of us.  The Affordable Care Act is not perfect and it probably will not solve all the problems with our healthcare system, but it is a huge step in the right direction, in my opinion.  The Affordable Care Act will help me, my children, my family and friends, and you too.

Here are 10 things that the Affordable Care Act does that can help you or someone you love, and all of this is at risk today with the Supreme Court’s ruling.  Much of this information came from the Healthcare.gov site and from Ezra Klein’s Wonkblog at the Washington Post.

1.  Making healthcare more affordable to those that can’t afford it.  Ezra Klein describes that “Families making less than 133 percent of the poverty line — that’s about $29,000 for a family of four — will be covered through Medicaid. Between 133 percent and 400 percent of the poverty line —  $88,000 for a family of four – families will get tax credits on a sliding scale to help pay for private insurance.  For families making less than 400 percent of the poverty line, premiums are capped. So, between 150% and 200% of the poverty line, for instance, families won’t have to pay more than 6.3 percent of their income in premiums. Between 300 percent and 400 percent, they won’t have to pay more than 9.5 percent.”

2.  The individual mandate is not really much of a mandate at all.  Ezra Klein explains, “When the individual mandate is fully phased-in, those who can afford coverage — which is defined as insurance costing less than 8 percent of their annual income — but choose to forgo it will have to pay either $695 or 2.5 percent of the annual income, whichever is greater.”  So, there is an out for all those that don’t want the government telling them what to do with their healthcare or making them buy something they don’t want to buy.  You won’t get thrown in jail or have your house taken away if you don’t buy health insurance.  Pay the small penalty and guess what, you still get the benefit of being able to get health insurance when you really need it – because you are hit by a bus or have a baseball size tumor in your chest – thanks to the Affordable Care Act mandating coverage for people with preexisting conditions. You know what though, the individual mandate works because people generally want to buy health insurance if they can afford it and if it provides adequate coverage.  Based on the individual mandate in Massachusetts, about 95% of the residents are now covered thanks to the individual mandate.

3.  Insurance companies are not allowed to discriminate based on preexisting conditions. They ARE allowed to discriminate based on age (limited to 3 to 1 ratio), premium rating area, family composition, and tobacco use (limited to 1.5. to 1 ratio).  Before the Affordable Care Act, insurance companies could deny you coverage because your kid has a developmental delay or autism, because you were pregnant, because you had cancer 10 years ago, because you have high blood pressure, or because you have a history of back pain.  Insurance companies could also choose to cover you, but charge you insanely high rates because of anything they deemed a preexisting condition.  For example, A 22-year-old woman could be charged 150% the premium that a 22-year-old man paid, just because of gender.  Under the Affordable Care Act, insurers can’t charge women higher premiums than they charge men.

4.  More of your premium dollars will be used for your care.  Ezra Klein explains that “The law requires insurers to spend between 80 and 85 percent of every premium dollar on medical care (as opposed to administration, advertising, etc). If insurers exceed this threshold, they have to rebate the excess to their customers. This policy is already in effect, and insurers are expected to rebate $1.1 billion this year.”

5.  Insurance Plans will be required to cover preventive services without out-of-pocket costs.  This means you will not have a co-pay or any out-of-pocket expense for things like mammograms, well-baby and child visits, breastfeeding support and equipment, vaccinations, and colonoscopies.  To see a more complete list of preventive services that will be covered, go to the healthcare.gov site.

6.  Kids under 26 can stay on their parents’ insurance policy.  This makes very good since so many young people are still in college or technical school, graduate school, or trying to get established in a job or profession during their early 20’s.  This allows many more young, healthy people to be covered for a reasonable cost.

7.  Insurance companies can no longer put a lifetime cap on your medical expenses.  Before the Affordable Care Act, many plans put an individual dollar cap on lifetime insurance payments , often around one million dollars.  That may sound like a lot of money, but anyone who has ever really been sick can tell you otherwise.  Healthcare is expensive –  insanely expensive.  For example, if you get cancer and need a stem cell transplant in your 20’s, you could use $500,000 of your lifetime benefit – not leaving much room for another major medical problem.  If you have a baby born prematurely, you could easily rack up hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical costs, before that child even leaves the hospital.  The Affordable Care Act prevents lifetime caps on insurance benefits, meaning you will actually be able to use your insurance when you really need it, even if your needs exceed some arbitrary dollar amount.

8.  The Affordable Care Act helps people with Medicare by protecting current benefits and offering new ones that will reduce costs.  It also helps to close the “donut hole” (gap in pharmaceutical drug coverage) for seniors by cutting the cost of prescriptions in half, saving them money.

9.  Increased coverage for workers at small businesses and tax breaks for small businesses that provide health insurance to employees.  Ezra Klein describes that “small businesses that have fewer than 10 employees, average wages beneath $25,000, and that provide insurance for their workers will get a 50 percent tax credit on their contribution. The tax credit reaches up to small businesses with up to 50 employees and average wages of $50,000, though it gets smaller as the business get bigger and richer. The credit lasts for two years, though many think Congress will be pressured to extend it, which would raise the long-term cost of the legislation.”

10.  Healthcare reform without increasing the deficit?  There is widespread disagreement and conflicting reports all over the media on this, but Ezra Klein noted that “the law is expected to spend a bit over $1 trillion in the next 10 years. The law’s spending cuts — many of which fall on Medicare — and tax increases are expected to either save or raise a bit more than that, which is why the Congressional Budget Office estimates that it will slightly reduce the deficit. (There’s been some confusion on this point lately, but no, the CBO has not changed its mind about this.) As time goes on, the savings are projected to grow more quickly than the spending, and CBO expects that the law will cut the deficit by around a trillion dollars in its second decade.”

We’ll find out very soon what the Supreme Court decides on the fate of healthcare reform and the Affordable Care Act.  Even if you disagree, what do you think about all or part of these 10 features and benefits of the reform?  If you agree that our healthcare system needs reform, but are not in support of the Affordable Care Act, even after educating yourself about what it includes, how would you propose we reform the system?  As a family with several preexisting conditions – cancer, developmental delays, 3 pregnancies and c-sections – I need the Affordable Care Act to be upheld.  As a citizen, taxpayer, consumer, and part of the health care delivery system, I anxiously await this important decision and hope it is upheld.

A few links to read more:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/wp/2012/06/24/11-facts-about-the-affordable-care-act/

http://www.healthcare.gov/news/factsheets/2011/08/women.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/wp/2012/06/26/the-irony-of-the-individual-mandate/

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/post/health-reform-with-a-mandate-the-massachusetts-story/2012/06/18/gJQAfohImV_blog.html